Rough-toothed dolphin (Steno brenadensis)

Its curious habit of swimming "in formation" makes this species a already easy to identify from afar.

They are usually seen in small family groups, between 10 and 20, and can sometimes gather in groups of up to a hundred individuals.

The rough-toothed dolphin se are found in tropical and warm temperate waters. 

It is a species that almost always stays in deep waters far from the coast, usually beyond the continental shelf. However, it is not uncommon to find them close to the coast in certain areas of our islands.

Although they could be confused with other species, such as the bottlenose dolphin, when seen up close some clear differences can be appreciated, such as the smooth profile from the melon to the beak, white lips, a more delayed dorsal fin and sometimes light or pinkish spots on the ventral and lateral area.

Dives of 70 metres and up to 15 minutes have been recorded but it is suspected that they may go deeper.

It feeds on fish and cephalopods.


They measure up to 2.50 m in length and weigh 150 kg.